• 03/02/18

    Immigration Relief for DACA Recipients Based on Fear of Return

    The Trump Administration’s decision on September 5, 2017 to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program casts uncertainty on the future of the approximately 800,000 individuals DACA has protected and places them at potential risk of removal to countries where they may face danger. This practice advisory is designed to help legal service providers screen former and current DACA recipients for eligibility for asylum and related humanitarian relief based on potential fear of return to their countries of origin.

  • 01/16/18

    FAQ: USCIS Is Accepting DACA Renewal Applications

    On January 9, 2018, Judge William Alsup of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California ordered a halt to the federal government’s termination of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program. In the case Regents of the University of California, et al. v. Department of Homeland Security, et al., Alsup granted a preliminary injunction — a temporary order blocking the termination of the DACA program while the case goes forward — requiring U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to begin accepting DACA renewal applications again. On January 13, 2018, USCIS announced its process for accepting renewal applications. USCIS also stated that further guidance about DACA renewal applications under the court order would be provided later. United We Dream and the National Immigration Law Center drafted the following answers to frequently asked questions about the Jan. 13 announcement.

  • 01/11/18

    Court Orders the Department of Homeland Security to Allow Individuals with DACA to Apply to Renew It

    On January 9, 2018, Judge William Alsup of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California ordered a halt to the federal government’s termination of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program. In the case Regents of the University of California, et al. v. Department of Homeland Security, et al., Alsup granted a preliminary injunction — a temporary order while the case goes forward — requiring U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to begin accepting DACA renewal applications again. This is an important victory, but it makes the need for Congress to do its job and pass the bipartisan Dream Act even greater.

  • 12/22/17

    What can you do if your DACA renewal application was rejected as not having been filed on time?

    OCTOBER 5, 2017, was the last day that U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) would accept applications to renew Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Only people whose DACA would expire between September 5, 2017, and March 5, 2018, were eligible to apply for a renewal. Many of those who applied were rejected for various reasons. This resource will help those who filed for renewal but were rejected to determine next steps.

  • 09/12/17

    Crimes and DACA Renewals – Practice Advisory

    The Trump Administration has announced the “phase-out” of DACA, and tens of thousands of DACA recipients must decide whether to apply for a last renewal. Other DACA recipients are wondering what may happen to them if they can’t or don’t renew. This is an especially worrisome situation for DACA recipients who have a criminal record. Acknowledging that we don’t yet have clear answers, this advisory will provide information to help advocates address the following questions with their clients: Is it “safe” for someone with a criminal history to renew their DACA application? What kinds of legal self-defense steps can people take, whether or not they apply to renew? What are the “dangerous crimes” that are bars to DACA and/or listed in the Notice to Appear Memorandum (NTA Memo)?

  • 09/12/17

    End of DACA FAQ’s (ILRC)

    On September 5, 2017 President Trump announced that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program would be phased out over two and a half years. On September 7, 2017, the ILRC held a webinar explaining the effect of the new announcement. This 9-page community advisory contains the Frequently Asked Questions from that webinar.

    A Spanish-language translation will be available shortly. Please check back to this page.

  • 09/11/17

    DACA Renewal Infographic

    This infographic is a visual flowchart to help community members and DACA recipients understand if they are eligible to renew their DACA now and what they need to know. Each of the infographic’s bulletpoints includes a hyperlink to more information.

  • 09/06/17

    About DACA and Employment

    On September 5, 2017, the Trump administration announced an end to the DACA program by rescinding the 2012 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program created under President Obama. This means that if you already have DACA, your DACA and related work permit will continue to be valid until the day they expire. No new DACA applications will be received or processed by DHS after September 5, 2017. If you have a permit that will expire between now and March 5, 2018, you may apply for a two-year renewal of your DACA which must be received by DHS by October 5, 2017. DHS will continue to process all renewal requests that were pending as of September 5, 2017.

    There’s much more information in the downloadable PDF.

  • 09/05/17

    What Do I Need to Know About The End of DACA?

    On September 5, 2017, President Trump directed the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to phase out and eventually end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) over two and half years. This community advisory lays out what this means for DACA recipients, those with pending applications, those who need to renew their DACA, and more.

    Translations of this advisory are in multiple languages. English, Spanish, Traditional Chinese and Simplified Chinese.

  • 09/01/17

    Screening Potential DACA Requestors for Other Forms of Relief

    This Practice Advisory is designed to assist attorneys without significant expertise in immigration law in determining whether individuals seeking Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) might be eligible for immigration benefits that are more lasting and concrete than DACA. The forms of relief discussed in this Practice Advisory include adjustment of status, U and T visas, asylum, special immigrant juvenile status, and more. The appendix includes a questionnaire that may be helpful in identifying individuals who qualify for one of these forms of relief.